Our Own Swimmin’ Hole

Day 2 in Geres and Vicki and I wanted to see the waterfall nearby. We've walked around in Ermida and it's pretty cool. It's a small town and they are fairly self sustaining. Everyone that lives in the village helps one another and contributes for the well being of the village. Passing through the alleyways, people are quite friendly often saying hello as we pass by. The hike itself was fairly short and didn't require too much effort - Just follow the signs to Cascata Rajada. I would say it was about 3km one way and the terrain wasn't too challenging....

6 Things I Wish I Knew at a Hawker Center

During the short period of time I've spent in Singapore, I've learned a lot about Singapore's iconic hawker centers. By no means am I calling myself an expert, but I think I've upgraded from being a newbie. I know enough just to get by. The layout of each center is fairly straight forward each food center is different and may contain a few to a lot of stalls with about 2-4 beverage stalls. I wanted to list 6 things I wish I knew before stepping foot inside a food center....

One Crazy Taxi Ride

7am: We hopped on a taxi after checking out of our hotel in Seminyak. We've done the usual song and dance of negotiating a price to a destination and off we went. We've asked the driver to turn off the A/C, we rolled down the window to feel a nice cool breeze and the driver blasted some music. Awesome....

Throwing Caution to the Wind

[vc_row row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column][vc_column_text]I had a taste of the local life on the drive in from the airport. The views were stunning; aromas of street food lingering through our air conditioned car. As we pulled up, you could hear hawkers selling sate (satay) from their food carts.. Since our cars weren't allowed to be separated from one another, I couldn't stop to smell / taste the satay.   I wanted to see it for real.   After some days in Lombok, Jimmy had agreed to drive the scooter to give me the opportunity to take some photos. I've asked the hotel reception...

The Struggle is Real: Men’s Travel Clothing

[vc_row row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column][vc_column_text]So Vicki and I have frequented MEC, Europe Bound, Sail, Atmosphere as well as online stores like backcountry.com or jet-setter. We've seen styles from Prana, Ex-Officio, Nau, Ten Trees, etc. Basically anything you could think of for travel gear, we've visited. One thing we've really noticed out of all those places is that the words "travel clothing" is synonymous to "back country" meaning, travellers areoften hiking or climbing and in need of lightweight technical clothing with high visibility colours. Which really isn't always the case for us and I'm assuming everyone else.   For the type of...

Iceland 101 – Part 4: Eating & Drinking

It can get really pricey when eating out in Iceland but a few tips to save some money is to eat fancy during lunch vs. dinner. The prices for the same meal items are generally 1/2 the cost of the dinner prices. I mean, once in a while, its good to splurge but if you spend a few extra days in Reykjavik, this might come in handy....

Iceland 101 – Part 3: Being Prepared

Being prepared is not just a scouts thing to do its something to always be aware of when travelling (I know, I’m probably preaching to the choir here since the whole purpose of reading these things are to be prepared.. Ha!) So before you head over to the bank and exchange your currencies to Krona and packing your snow gear during your summer Iceland trip, read on! ...

Iceland 101 – Part 2: Zip Zip Zip!

Best way to see Iceland is by renting a car. Although they have a good network of busses throughout the Island and they even have stops at the local landmark off of Road 1, but the ease and freedom you get with the car is top notch. ...

Iceland 101 – Part 1: Where to Stay

Most of you all know that both Vicki and I LOVE Iceland. Each visit, we've tried to do something differently: we've camped; drove the entire ring road; ventured off in the magnificent West Fjords; hiked and ice climbed on one of many glaciers; explored cities and small fishing towns; swam in pools and hot rivers; and ate local or touristy delicacies....

The thing about tours…

There are times where I feel that booking tours are for chumps. "Why book a tour where the guide will take you to places with all the other toursists.. " blah blah blah. I've always had this mentality whenever I would plan out a trip and doing tours only to places where I absolutely need one (ie: glacier trekking, rafting etc.) otherwise, I'd rather plan it myself. In short, a DIY attitude....